Alma facade face-off to be front and centre in the coming month


city_scope_logo-cmykIf you have been following this corner over the past couple of weeks, you know there is a divide in the ranks of the Alma College International Alumnae Association as to whether there is merit to replicating the facade of the main building at the former school for girls as part of proposed three-apartment complex.
At issue here is a 2008 Ontario Municipal Board decision that determined any new development on the Moore Street property must recreate the north façade of Alma to a depth of three metres.
The issue is on the agenda for Monday’s (Aug. 13) meeting of city council.
The developer, Michael Loewith of Patriot Properties, has submitted a letter to council outlining his vision for the Alma College property.
Loewith writes, he was intrigued by the OMB order and the opportunity it presented to pursue his two passions, history and development. Continue reading

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Preservation of facade ‘not the best way to respect Alma’


 

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Alma College plaque

Response to our item Saturday (Aug. 4) about Lara Leitch and her assertion she and other members of the Alma College International Alumnae Association “want the college’s memory and façade preserved because of its cultural and architectural heritage in the city,” was both swift and staunchly opposed to preservation.
Leitch was referring to the 2008 Ontario Municipal Board decision that determined any new development must recreate the north façade of Alma to a depth of three metres.
It is Leitch’s belief city council and the developer of a proposed three-apartment complex on the Moore Street property are trying to skirt this ruling.
Within hours of publication Saturday, Donna Robertson emailed this corner to stress preserving the facade of the main building does little to honour the former school for girls. Continue reading

Mysterious mishap dislodges Alma pillar


Alma College suffered further indignity this week when a granite column at the front entrance to the property was dislodged by a work vehicle.

Apart from the remains of the amphitheatre, the two columns and fencing at the entrance off Moore Street are among the few remnants of the former school for girls that succumbed to arsonists on May 28, 2008.

30jt04almajpgA construction crew was at the site around 2:30 a.m. Monday when a vehicle hit the column, toppling it and separating the cap from the main pillar.

London developer Gino Reale, who purchased the 11-acre site in March of this year from the Zubick family of London, was uncertain as to why the workers chose to enter the property in the middle of the night.   Continue reading

Alma College sold to London developer


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Gino Reale of London stands outside the gate of the former Alma College with the music building and chapel still standing.

Reduced to a neglected jumble of bricks, rubble and a couple of crumbling structures, the former Alma College property has been sold to a London-based property manager.
The deal closed March 7 and Gino Reale, who deals in real estate development and land acquisitions, confirmed two days later he is acting on behalf of a group of investors.
The 11-acre site had previously been owned by the Zubick family of London who purchased it for approximately $900,000 in 1998.
Under the corporate name Alma Heritage Estates, several proposals were put forth by the Zubicks including a pitch to the city to locate a new Valleyview Home on the Moore St. property.
In 2005, Alma Heritage Estates applied to city for a demolition permit to level the former school for girls.

Continue reading

Will council give green light to Sutherland Press building demolition?


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Entitled ‘Demolition of an Unsafe Building,’ a report to mayor and council Tuesday from Chris Peck, chief building official, would appear to clearly indicate the city has had enough dealings with the owner of the Sutherland Press building.
Peck is asking council to approve a tender submitted by Schouten Excavating of Watford, Ont., in the amount of $101,135 for demolition of what remains of the four-storey structure owned by David McGee of Toronto.
To recap recent history, on Sept, 16 of last year the city posted an emergency order on the building following a partial roof collapse at the southwest corner of the structure at Moore Street.

Continue reading

Yes, the insurance was indeed paid


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Tony Hofstee sure lit up the T-J Facebook page with his letter to the editor documenting the efforts of volunteers and committee members associated over the years with the Holiday Fantasy of Lights.
His long list of items and services paid for by the Fantasy of Lights will come as a revelation to many, including mayor and members of council
These include electrical work and supplies, upgrades to the washrooms, trees and plants for Pinafore Park, donations to other worthy organizations and the list goes on.
Tony closed his letter with the hope “the mayor and parks director Catharine Spratley apologize to the volunteers who ran the Fantasy. Yes mayor, we did pay our own insurance!”
His letter elicited dozens of responses, including this sampling:
Lori Calvert posted, “Well done Tony. I am glad someone put into print all that we (all previous and current members) did that went unnoticed. But sadly this will fall on deaf ears … if I had a dollar for every time I heard someone say ‘why didn’t they ask for volunteers?’ The bottom line is always missed. FOL didn’t ask for hand-outs and money just stop putting up road blocks and charging fees when it is for the betterment of the entire city!!!” Continue reading