Dalewood bridge deemed unsafe; closed permanently


Many north-end St. Thomas residents will have to adjust their driving habits as of today (Nov. 30).
Following an inspection Wednesday, the Dalewood bridge has been deemed unsafe and is now closed permanently.
dalewoodjpgThe Bailey bridge was installed at Dalewood Dam as a temporary structure in 1983 at a cost of $35,000. It was due to be replaced with a new, two-lane bridge featuring a multi-use path incorporated into the design at a cost of $4.5 million.
Dalewood bridge conceptual cross-sectionjpgCity manager Wendell Graves said construction of the new bridge will begin next spring and will not be moved up due to today’s closure.
Detour routes will be posted for motorists.

Related posts:

New Dalewood bridge gives city a creative opportunity

Permanent solution to a temporary fix

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Inquest called into death of St. Thomas flagman


An inquest has been called into the death of a St. Thomas man killed while directing traffic at a construction site on the Hwy. 3 bypass.
Brian Daniel deathjpgOn July 2, 2014, 55-year-old Brian Daniel was flagging vehicles around a boom crane obstructing traffic in the westbound lane of the bypass at Burwell Road.
He was struck and killed by a pickup truck driven by a 46-year-old Aylmer man, who was charged with dangerous driving causing death.
An inquest is mandatory under the Coroners Act, and Dr. Rick Mann, Regional Supervising Coroner for West Region, London Office, announced Monday it will begin Feb. 5th, 2018 at the Elgin County Courthouse in St. Thomas.
It is expected to last four days and hear from approximately eight witnesses.
The jury may make recommendations aimed at preventing similar deaths.

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Will transit continue to take a back seat in St. Thomas?


city_scope_logo-cmykFor those who rely on St. Thomas Transit, change may be a passenger in the coming year.
The transit contract with Voyageur – originally in effect Jan. 1, 2012 – expires at the end of the year and the city has the option to enter into a three-year extension.
The transit system was up for discussion at council’s Nov. 20 reference committee meeting at city hall, where the director of environmental services, Justin Lawrence, brought mayor and council up to speed on the five-route system.
In 1989 the hub and spoke system operated with traditional transit buses on a 45-minute cycle over a 14-hour day, Monday through Saturday.
Today, the same hub and spoke system operates 11.5 hours per day (except Sunday) on a 30-minute cycle utilizing buses not far removed from RV’s that struggle to remain in one piece over what appears to be a five-year life span. Continue reading

So, this guy comes up to me and asks, ‘When is the next bus to St. Thomas?’


city_scope_logo-cmykWhile this country’s passenger train network has been picked clean to the bone like so much road kill, Toronto transportation writer and policy adviser Greg Gormick notes it is no coincidence the topic of rail travel ebbs and flows with the election tide.
His clients have included CP, CN, VIA and numerous elected officials and government transportation agencies.
One of his latest undertakings has him consulting for Oxford County to document concerns about the province’s high-speed rail (HSR) proposal linking Toronto with London and eventually Windsor.
Gormick warns HSR will further contribute to the decline of VIA passenger rail service to Woodstock, Ingersoll, Brantford, Stratford, St. Marys and other communities in the region. Continue reading

Mergers are all about creating efficiencies, so who will be left at the alter in health unit marriage?


city_scope_logo-cmykFriday’s announcement of the proposed merger of Elgin St. Thomas Public Health and Oxford County Public Health – which aligns with the province’s call for fewer health units with autonomous boards – is, no doubt, intended to create efficiencies.
Such is the desired effect of any merger, no matter the business sector.
To quote the media release, the two health units “began exploring a potential merger as a way of working towards a strong, unified rural voice for public health in Ontario.”
To further quote from the release, “The intent to merge was formalized through a letter of intent signed by Oxford County Warden David Mayberry on November 8 and Elgin St. Thomas Board of Health Chair Bernie Wiehle on November 9. The letter of intent commits both organizations to a review of each other’s finances, operations and assets; to equally sharing any costs associated with the merger; and to pursuing the necessary statutory and regulatory change at the provincial level before the merger becomes official.” Continue reading

Community engagement is critical for the new hand at police helm


city_scope_logo-cmykA raft of announcements emanating from the latest Police Services Board meeting held mid-October, including Deputy Chief Jeff Driedger announcing his retirement, to take effect some time next year.
That triggered the board to approve the contract of Chris Herridge as new police chief, effective Jan. 1 of 2018 and running through to February of 2024.
In conjunction with that announcement, Insp. Marc Roskamp will become acting Deputy Chief, with no increase in salary until he officially assumes the role on April 1, 2018.
Staff Sgt. Scott Barnes is promoted to acting inspector effective Jan. 1 of next year with no increase in salary until he officially is promoted on April 1, 2018.
And, Const. Chris Johnson will be promoted to acting sergeant at the beginning of the new year, again with no increase in salary until he officially is promoted on April 1, 2018.
We talked at length with the new police chief on Friday as he assumes the leadership role vacated by former chief Darryl Pinnell. Continue reading