Best of intentions reduced to dust in Sutherland Press building demolition


city_scope_logo-cmykCity manager Wendell Graves advises Schouten Excavating employees are expected on site at the Sutherland Press building the week of Oct. 16 to begin demolition work.
According to the city’s agreement, the contractor has 30 days to demolish the four-storey structure, although as chief building inspector Chris Peck indicated previously, the site itself may not be totally cleared of debris in that period of time.
Once demolition has reached a certain stage, re-opening of the adjacent transit centre will be possible.
At this point, Talbot Street will remain open during the demolition and Graves adds Moore Street may be opened to traffic sooner than expected if the demolition work can be contained on site. Continue reading

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Land-use planner warns St. Thomas is suffering from ‘sign disease’


city_scope_logo-cmykIt was a sign of what lies ahead for city staff in St. Thomas. An overview of the proposed 2017 advertising sign bylaw ran into stiff opposition at this week’s reference committee meeting.
Amendments to the existing bylaw to deal with portable signs in the downtown core faced vocal opposition from more than two dozen small businesses and area sign companies.
The bylaw would prohibit portable advertising signs in the downtown business area and limit them to one per commercial lot outside the core and three per industrial lot.
A-board signs would still be permitted but would have to come in off the sidewalk at the end of the day.
It’s a restriction similar to what’s in place in London and Sarnia.

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“Difficult decision” made to cancel this year’s Fire Muster


The St. Thomas Professional Firefighters Association and the St. Thomas Fire Muster Days committee have made “the very difficult decision” to cancel this year’s Fire Muster which was to run Sept. 2 and 3.
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In a release issued Wednesday, the move to cancel was announced so that members of the association can pay their respects to Fire Chief Rob Broadbent, who died Monday of cancer.
In the release, Fire Muster chairman Daryl Smith noted, “We did not make this decision lightly as a lot of planning has been invested into this event. However we are confident our decision is appropriate in these circumstances.”
Smith added, “We appreciate the community’s understanding with regard to this difficult decision.
“I would also like to thank colleagues, friends and the entire community as we pay our respects to Chief Broadbent and support his family over the next few days.”

The muster, which has drawn close to 10,000 visitors in past years, is being cancelled for the first time in its 35-year history.

The service for Rob Broadbent will be held 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 2 at Central United Church, 135 Wellington St., St. Thomas.

Visitation is Thursday from 7-9 p.m. and again Friday from 1-3 and 7-9 p.m. at Shawn Jackson Funeral Home, 31 Elgin Street.

What’s in a name? In this case, $2.7 million


city_scope_logo-cmykThe city this week locked in place two more pieces of the Talbot Street West redevelopment puzzle with announcement of the purchase of two properties from London developer Shmuel Farhi.
The acquisitions are the Mickleborough Building at 423 Talbot Street – the home of Ontario Works since 2000 – and a parcel of land on the south side of Talbot St., between William and Queen streets, and stretching south to Centre Street.
While a conditional offer was announced last April the delay, according to city manager Wendell Graves, revolved around environmental issues.
“We have done due diligence over and above so we know exactly what we are facing,” stressed Graves. “In our approved city budget this year we have funds allocated there to begin some cleanup. Because we are looking to use pieces of that site for residential, under the Ministry of the Environment regs, that is the highest order of cleanup that will be required.”

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